Thursday, February 25, 2010

Wolf Attack


Wolves don't attack people … of course not. They just hunt field mice. Sure!

Well, tell that to the family of a little 3-year-old girl who was playing at a picnic area in Ontario's Lake Superior Provincial Park in Canada last summer. As the girl played, unaware of the danger, a male wolf suddenly came on the scene and bit into the girl's are and started dragging her away.

When the girl's grandparents chased away the wolf, the animal wandered down the beach where it found fresh prey. Brenda Wright and her children had just finished their picnic lunch when the wolf lunged at Brenda's 12-year-old son, tearing into his buttocks. Then the wolf turned its attention on the boy's sister and took her by the scalp. When Brenda attempted to protect her children, the wolf slashed her hands and legs.

It's no secret that the government's decision to reintroduce wolves in parts of America where that animal was a natural predator in the past has succeeded far beyond anyone's expectations. The wolves are breeding like rabbits, and roving packs are starting to move around the upper-tier of Americans states, taking their food wherever they can find it. And they're finding a lot of it. Ranchers are now fighting hard to keep wolf predation of their flocks and herds at bay.

As can be seen from the incidents I mentioned above, it's not just sheep and calves that are at risk. Domestic dogs are being slaughtered by wolf packs in some areas of the country, and even humans are not off the wolf menu. In fact, I've got 8 pages of reports about wolf attacks on humans (and not just children, but adult men and women), so don't get the idea that the two incidents mentioned above are an anomaly.

Keep in mind that these animals are not particularly afraid of humans, so they will walk right into your camp and take your food off your plate, rummage through your tent, and chase you up a tree. So what are you supposed to do to protect yourself in an encounter with wolves?
  • Up a tree — that's not a bad idea. Wolves can't climb trees, so you are safe if you can get up one. However, the wolf (or the pack) might just take up residence at the base of the tree and wait for you to get tired and come down. 
  • Maintain a clean camp to keep from attracting wolves into camp with the smell of food. 
  • Don't run, as that will only stimulate the wolf to attack. You can't outrun them, so you have to stand and fight for your life. 
  • Try to make yourself look as large as possible. Wave your arms and coat, hoist a backpack overhead to make you look bigger. 
  • Do not make eye contact, because that is taken as an act of aggression on your part and might trigger an attack. 
  • Don't grin or show your teeth, for the same reason. 
  • Get on your feet and kick, scream and fight back. Wolves have been known to attack humans as they slept in sleeping bags, where the victim is at a serious disadvantage. The sooner you can get up on your feet and start yelling at the wolf and fighting back, the better. 
  • Use any weapon at hand, a club, a walking staff, a knife, a gun, a mountaineering axe. 
  • Try to strike its nose, as this is a very sensitive area. 
  • Protect your face and throat by using your forearm to fend off the attack. 
  • As last resort, ram your fist down the animal's throat. You will get torn up a bit, but the wolf won't be able to rip up more critical parts of your body. 
  • Stay in groups. Wolves are less likely to attack if you are in a large group than if you are alone. 
  • Maintain a fire in camp all night, because wolves don't like fire.

    65 comments:

    1. I got attacked by 2 grey wolves once in Vermont. I ripped their eyes out. they both ran off and I left with a minor bite on the arm. I suggest anyone in the same situation to simply feed off their adrenaline and aim for the eyes.

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      1. This is a lie. How do I know, wolves were hunted to extinction in Vermont and have not been around there in nearly 100 years. And coyotes, well, I very highly doubt. As I live in Ontario, and have a population of about 3000 coyotes in my back yard, I know their behavoir fairly well. Your cat and small dog isn't really safe, but a coyote attack on a human is extremely rare and usually involves rabies or mange.

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      2. You're exactly right. I too live in Ontario, and in Uxbridge alone we have well over 1000 coyotes. I work at a golf course and have occasionally been sniffed and yelped at by a male but the instant I stood up the whole pack took off with their tales between their legs.

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      3. You both lost all credibility when you started talking about coyotes. Coyotes and wolves are not the same thing. Wolves are much bigger and don't generally go wandering around in peoples back yards unless you are in a real rural area. I live in an extremely rural area of Norther Ontario, where there are wolves in abundance as well as coyotes. I've only seen about twelve wolves in my life while i've seen 100s of coyotes. Coyotes are whimps but I still wouldn't be stupid enough to back one into a coroner they'd leave you with a nasty bite. Coyotes are more dangerous in my opinion because they will venture into town on a daily basis well wolves tend to stay on the outskirts. A wolf is a large powerful predator that is perfectly capable of killing you. It is the same with black bears on average they are going to avoid you but don't be stupid and mistake them for pets they are wild animals that can and do attack.

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    2. Bullshit you did. I don't understand why people feel the need to lie about stupid shit like that.

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    3. wolves arent that threatning im going to yellow stone next next week

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      1. so wolves arent threatening because you are going to yellowstone? How have you proven anything?

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      2. i just found out something so stupid i heard it is illegal to imitate a wolf howl while in the park

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    4. I am pretty sure there are no wolves in VT- coyotes, yes, but wolves have not been seen in VT in over 100 years.

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    5. Wolves aren't dangerous I live in Arkansas and theirs wolves running around were i live and i go out riding horses including young horses and never get attacked I've road up close to their den before and diffident get attacked. And they haven't attacked locals and were i live theirs nothing but ranches. I believe it's use that make them feel scared. Think of it like when theirs a new animal running around and we feel threatened. That's how it feels to them.

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      1. Ok just because it hasn't happened to you doesn't mean it hasn't happened to a lot of people and just because it hasnt happened to you before doesn't mean it won't

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      2. i went on an inviromental field trip where we went hiking out at nighttime when it was really dark. we heard coyotes but the instructor told us that they were just as scared of us as we were of them.

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      3. Wolves are not dangerous? Get real! They are a large predator that can weigh up to 150lbs and their behavior is based on instinct. If they are hungry enough, they will attack a human. That is like saying a lion will not attack you just because you don't attack lions-If someone meets a wolf in the wild, and it shows aggressive behavior, assume that it may attack you either for food or territory. Even a feral dog has no problem attacking people for food, especially in a pack. I have encountered feral dogs when I was younger living in rural areas. They will eat what they can bring down, and sorry to inform you, that could be you.

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      4. Come to Idaho, you'll think of wolves as not only dangerous but also terrifying. The wolves in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are enormous Canadian wolves and they'll tear you apart. Just because Arkansas has some large dogs doesn't mean up North they come the same way.

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    6. LOL Bullshit. Come to Northern Ontario. A timberwolf went after my 8 year old son at 5 oclock this evening. I dare you to spend the night in a tent in my yard. I'm an experienced hunter and I've lived here my entire life and I've never seen that happen before. Just because it didn't happen to you doesn't mean it's not impossible.

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      1. Although I believe that your 8 yr old was attacked by a wolf, I don't believe it was for the purpose of food. I think what probably happened is the wolf was passing through the area, and your son, like most boys was bouncing around and making noise. The wolf probably saw that as an act of aggression and went at your boy. If a wolf was stalking your boy as food, then he would have spent quite a bit of time in the tree line first, watching his prey. Wolves watch and study their prey before attacking. If that is the case, then you should have been watching your boy and his surroundings more carefully considering you live in an area with wolves!

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    7. Up here in the Northwest, grey wolves are apex predators with government protection and few enemies. Please don't underestimate the problem until you've lived with our circumstances or contribute to a family's distress with your disbelief based on your experiences with a different species.

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    8. Grey wolves in the Northwest are apex predators with government protection, few enemies, and little fear of man. Please don't judge our situation nor contribute further to a family's grief based on your experience with a different species over a thousand miles away.

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      1. Most wolves have a great deal of fear for humans. The problem comes mostly with wolves from National Parks. These parks are filled with tourists who have no right being close to nature. They leave food about and what not and the wolves learn to go into urban areas for easy meals. The same problem with Black Bears at Algonquin. I can no longer park my truck there because the black bears will smash out the windows and crawl in looking for an easy meal do to the 1000's of idiots that pack their food in the car rather than use the provided bear boxes or getting a bear vault and putting it in a tree like they should.

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      2. I agree with Lenny burch on everything

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    9. Everything is impossible until its done...if it was done its not impossible...it can be done again and again...never under estimate the impossible!

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      1. I shutter when I see women running on a trail alone. I think that they are so naive. I have been attacked 4 times by another kind of predator (man!) and your statement, for me holds a profound truth. My result was PTSD.
        I've also run into rattlesnakes 5 times and my husband and I have been stalked by a cougar, here in northern Utah, twice. Hair standing on end and tracks to prove it! So, please, do not underestimate the dangers out there.

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    10. There are few known cases of wolf attacks here in Finland. Due to close proximity to Russia, the number of wolves has increased over the years. Fortunately they rarely prey or attacks humans, however they tend to prey on pets and farm animals. So they have rather bad reputation here, and are likely to get hostile response if spotted by hunters. Although it's illegal to kill wolfs, without permission from EU.

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    11. I feel bad for the families that have been attacked by wolves. But there had to be a reason for it they just don't attack for no reason. May be you just startled it or may be you were near the food it was going to eat but you were there and it felt threated or it had pups near by. There was a reason you just didn't know and it wasn't just because it wanted u for a meal

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    12. Seriously? Look stuff up. It's rare for a wolf to attack people, they're not fearless of us, and they don't attack just for fun. They do it because they're hungry. In the wild, they go for the young and the weak because that's the easiest prey. If you're stupid enough to leave your eight-year-old outside where you know there are dangerous things (and not just wolves) then you should not be a parent. The original writer should have done more research and realized that wolf attacks aren't as common as he or she apparently thinks they are. Despite that, this is good advice if by some tiny odds you do encounter a hungry wolf. Just remember that during that encounter, it's probably the wolf who's going to be running away. They're afraid of people.

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    13. Afraid of people?.....right.They are natural killers anyone who doesnt see that is in my assumption ignorant. Educate yourself before making a bold assertions about a meat eating predator.

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      1. that is a stereotype assumption made by idiotic people...they may be natural killers but if you think about it, so are we.

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      2. Yes, educate yourself...

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_attacks_on_humans

        Try this first...

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      3. Most wild animals are shy of humans but like humans not all can be trusted be smart and respectful of nature and its inhabitants try to avoid any contact with all wild animals also know what to do if attacked

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    14. Bri... Really? I'm a life-long resident of Arkansas myself (sixth generation, Ozark / Boston Mountain Region) and your story is for the dogs. I think you're misidentifying Coyotes or Feral Dogs. There hasn't been a sustained wolf population by official accounts in 70 or so years. Old timers (now long dead) told me stories about "wolf hunts" from the 1900s through the late-1940s, but there hasn't been a documented "wild" wolf in in decades, let alone a den of them.

      Suffice to say, there is way too much misinformation floating about on wolves from both sides. There have been documented attacks on humans in North America (while not many) so wolves are not to be taken lightly, but really, you're more likely to get attacked by a domestic dog. Two documented human deaths in North America in the last 20 years have been attributed to predatory wolves, more have died by shark bite/attack or brown bear. During that same time period, more than 400 people have been killed by dogs. About 20 people were killed by Cougars the US in the last 20 years. Heck, 12 people die each year from snake bites. It's all a matter perspective.

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    15. Never believe that you can accurately predict how almighty nature will or will not behave one moment to the next. It is not wise.

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    16. Even if wolves dont attack hummans they are distroying hunting all over. this is the first year i have gone without getting an elk. because wolves have destroyed elk and dear population all over the us

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      1. Well do you really need that deer to survive? The wolves actually need deer to survive, and remember they're wild animzls they hunt...

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      2. Well then stop hunting Elk! Wolves need to hunt to survive, you can go to WalMart like the rest of us. You bitch and cry there is not enough Elk to hunt. How do you think the wolves feel. There are not many wolves left due to the over hunting of them from 1900 to 1940, however there are 7 billion humans. It's pretty ridiculous of you to blame the wolves for your lack of a catch, and quite frankly, I hope a pack of wolves takes you down for stealing their dinner.

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      3. Some people have to hunt elk and deer for food to survive thank you very much! so you can shut your big mouth!, an for coyotes not attacking i know for a fact that if they are hungry enough and get the chance they will attack! i have lived in the woods all my life and have seen to many coyotes standing in my yard at night to count. So try living in the woods with all the animals that go BUMP in the night then you can try runnin your fricken mouth!! But until that happens you can shut up!!

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      4. Does it have to be an elk? It is more natural that wolf hunts so it's understandable. You can't blame them for trying to survive. And if you hate the wood so bad why don't you go live somewhere else instead of just sitting there complain about your wild life and wolves that trying to survive?!

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    17. ahh its all bullshit just take a gun or dont go simple as that

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      1. LOL I love your enthusiasm May 23rd, made me laugh!

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    18. In northern Canada here, it is illegal to hunt wolves in many areas. I believe the wolves have lost their natural fear of humans over the generations. I have seen more and more wolves all the time when hunting. They are getting less afraid and sometimes openly show themselves.

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      1. Yep. Just last weekend a wolf stalked my fiance and I and our dog as we were skiing with a sled to our cabin. When I started yelling as loud and deep as I could, kicking off the skis and waving them over my head, the wolf didn't back off at all and gave a last warning growl.

        We had to leave the sled and back up to the car and honk the horn for a few minutes before trying again. Thank god the dog was on leash at the time.

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      2. Where was this? I just moved to Yellowknife and have heard talk about wolves close to town...

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    19. Look up the history of wolf attacks. In France alone, from 1580-1830, over 3000 people were killed by wolves. That's one country. Do the math.

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    20. Well, I must say I do enjoy reading every bodies thoughts. Some I agree with, others not so much. Wolves are wild animals. Wild animals are unpredictable because they are wild. (Duh) There for wolves are unpredictable. One day a wolf could appear frightened and run away from you. The next week the same wolf could terrorize a campsite and kill somebody. All for different reasons only the wolf understands. Experts and campers and hunters alike can put in their best guesses, which I respect, but in the end I state that you cannot treat a WOLF like a book and put one thought on a shelf where it stays the same forever.

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    21. I dance with wolves, they are my dog buddies!! Now pass me the dutch, a few more hits and I'll tell yall about my tiger pals...... honestly, it sounds like you're all saying the same thing and then disputing about it, so from all of your comments I summed up " wolves are not entirely bad animals but they are animals and at some point in time you could be attacked by 1 or more so try to be prepared if you are going around or live in an area where wolves are!"

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    22. cover yourself in bacon then walk outside :D

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    23. wolves don't attack people. Bullshit. 2 wolves came to my camp and i was alone. they approached me and i made myself stay calm. They looked around and then just left, not exactly a brutal killer.

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      1. The reason they didn't attack you was either A: they felt no need or B: you didn't show fear

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    24. A reasonable source for information is the world-wide study of wolf attacks on humans done by the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research. The finding of the report was that during the 100 years of the 20th century there were between twenty and thirty attacks in North America (including Alaska and Canada). Of these, three were fatal, all because of rabies. For comparison, each year in the United States, 16-18 people die from dog attacks. There has never been a documented case of a healthy, wild wolf killing a person in North America. The injuries that have occurred were caused by a few wolves that became fearless of humans due to habituation. Wolves are generally not dangerous or a threat to humans. Wolves are shy and generally avoid humans.

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      1. Wow, Thank you Anonymous. This is the first intelligent thing I have seen on this entire page. Finally someone who actually does their homework before spewing off at the mouth of rumours and wild fantasies.
        I spend much time in wolf territory and I have had them very near to me many times. Although, like every species, there are a few rotten eggs, wolves for the most part are harmless, as long as you know how to behave and give them the respect they deserve.

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    25. Wow... I don't know where you get your information from, but you are way off! Wold attacks in North America are very low, much lower than any other predator of it's size. Kicking and screaming at a wolf will be taken as a sign of aggression and will cause an attack.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_attacks_on_humans

      I have personally fave many wolves, I live in Canada and I backpack quite a bit in the parks that have re-intoduced wolves, and in many other parts of Northern Canada where there are wolves. I have encountered wolves on numerous occassions.
      I have caught them trying to steal my food pack but they leave as soon as they hear me coming.
      The trick with wolves is like all dogs, wild and dommesticated. They are pack animals and live under an Alpha. You will always know the alpha as he will be the one standing out front and staring you down. If you get rid of the alpha, the others will always follow.
      When wolves are in the area, make a lot of noise, bear bells also work for wolves. Stand your ground, but don't be aggressive. Do not start directly in the wolves eyes. Stare at the ground in front. Hold your arms out and you jacket up to make yourself appear larger. Slowly back away, and talk to the wold in a subtle tone.
      In most cases, your first glimpse will be your last as the wolves will leave the moment you are heard, however, if you have come near a den with pups, or near a fresh kill they will defend it. It is thier territory, respect it, and slowly back away.
      Wolves do not percieve humans as prey, and if you do not make yourself seem a threat, they will just snarl and show teeth until you leave.
      Wolves are majestic animals, very intelligent, and beautiful. I am honoured to share this land with them, and I give them the respect they deserve. Do the same, and you will have no problem with them.
      Happy hiking.

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    26. Reading this actually made me laugh.
      Wolves are typically shy animals around humans - the cases in which they simply approach a human and attack it is infact an anomaly. I find it ridiculously frustrating how close minded people can be. The cases in which you are attacked by a wolf, hell, you're probably in its territory. And as much as people claim that wolves are approaching us, the human population is expanding into what used to be wolf habitat, and we are either destroying it or settling there, and then getting angry and confused as to why wolves attack us. And when the original writer (the incredibly smart person that you are) where you have the eight pages of cases of being attacked, that's would be almost certainly over the past 50 to 60 years. Those frustrating people who tell us to 'go get some facts' we are listing facts here for you, so you are either trolling or you're just ignorant. And although some of the techniques listed if you encounter a wolf may be effective, some of the things like kicking and screaming and throwing things at them is probably best left when the wolf actually shows aggressive behavior instead of just presuming the animal is going to maul you.
      I'm a 15 year old girl, and I find it so depressing that the people that can help this endangered species (and yes, many of the subspecies of wolves are actually endangered, some like the Ethiopian and red wolf, critically so)
      So please, even if you don't like these animals, I do, and so do many other people, so although you yourself are not driving the animals to extinction, this is the kind of attitude that wipes out species everyday.

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      1. 15 year old girl is wise beyond her years.

        Although wild, I wouldn't say wolves are unpredictable. What we perceive as aggression may actually be defense. What we think is unprovoked may be an accidental threat. We provoke more "unprovoked" attacks than we think.

        We go into their territory, our rules no longer apply.

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      2. Alright, I think these comments have gone a bit far with everyone trying to explain their own thoughts. To each their own, really. You can't make the next person agree with everything you say, so just read the article and think your own thought! I must say though I definitely agree with the "15 year old girl" and November 19th whoever you are. Well said in my opinion. BTW does anyone know where I can find any other forums about this "Getting Out Alive?" Thanks, General Kenobi

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    27. hey everybody, i have been reading these comments after having read the article and i have to say just one tiny little thing... wolves are wild animals ( this may seem obvious, but don't rip me to shreds just yet) they also vary not just with breed but they are as individual as humans. each with their own life experience and level of need, which will drive them to do what they need to survive. i am from washington state, i am an avid backpacker, i have done long treks in mostly western states and never seen one (bears and cougars all the time). i am going to alaska this year and it was recomended to me to figure out what to worst case about wolves, and i think that what he is talking about here. all i hear is don't look like a snack and fight back:) i can do that. what i do not understand is how you all can be at each others throats like this it seems like it should follow the same rules, don't act like a snack, those humans can be dangerous even when you dont insight them. be safe the worlds not full of unicorns and rainbows (and even the unicorns have pointy spikes on their heads) - jaquelyn

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    28. interesting comments, have only had a couple of encounters with solitary wolves, not too close mind you, so i do agree that they tend to be weary of humans. i have not encounterd a pack of wolves, yet it figures a increase in numbers could equal an increase in confidence. i suppose the chances of an actual attack are remote, yet possible in the wrong circumstances. as an avid hiker throughout norhtern ontario, i do encounter black bears quite frequently. their size alone can be very unsettling at first glance, so i can only imagine what emotions the sighting of a wolf pack might stir up.

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    29. It's neither the case that wolves are ravenous devourers of humans, nor that they are completely harmless to us. The risk of an attack is not zero, but it is small - it's a lot smaller than that another person is going to kill you, that's for sure.

      I think that people are more afraid of the unfamiliar than the familiar. Dogs attack people, including fatally, every year, and few people fear dogs. Most familiar of all, people attack people in droves - Americans murder their fellows at a rate of about 15,000 every year - it's a massacre out there.

      There is also a certain amount of hysteria about bears. While I understand that something *could* happen, I feel a LOT safer walking or sleeping in the woods than on a city street, I can tell you that. And I've been attacked by people, but never by wolves or bears, and I've seen enough bears in the wild.

      Get a little education on avoiding close encounters with animals and then use common sense, and you will be safer than you will be around other humans.

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    30. being educated doesnt mean you're not dumb/stupid, as intelligence is with knowledge. 2 people got attacked in a town north of winnipeg manitoba. they're getting hungry. i would like to know more of how to fend off wolves for its becoming a real problem for us. feedback please, not mindless "bullshit"'s or such negative comments. they're eating our dogs and could possibly have rabies. we're far from city civilization so it would be hard to get a trained professional to help.

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      1. Fences! For the love of all things people, watch your dogs or bring them inside after they go to the bathroom. The best defense is fences with or without barbed wire, electric fences, vigilance, and common sense. The likelihood of rabies is rather small. You're more likely to get rabies from a horse. Plus if the wolves had rabies, you would know. That kind of erratic behavior is very noticeable; even in its early stages you can tell something is very "off" about the animal.

        Put your garbage cans in your garage or another enclosed space so the wolves aren't attracted to the smell of rotting food. Never give eye contact to a wolf if its close to you, move slowly away. Do what you can with your town council or local government to see if there is over-hunting of the wolves' main food sources (deer, elk, moose, rabbit, etc). Rally for stricter hunting limits on those animals if that's the case. When a naturally occurring food source runs out that's usually when wild animals start hanging around people a lot. Dogs and other domesticated animals are easy prey in an area where deer, elk, or a wolf's other natural prey may be difficult to find. Always, for the past some odd thousands of years it's been the fault of man that animals attack man. Now we are finding loss of habitat and food sources are resulting in wild animal attacks all over.

        Keep your yard picked up, watch your animals, fence them if necessary, don't let rotting food sit outside anywhere, clean up after grilling outdoors (that means getting the grease off the grill and taking the grease can and ashes to the garbage). If you remove the sources of food or the idea that food is easily found in the vicinity, the animal will go elsewhere.

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    31. Anonymous, from what I was told by the wolf peopke up in northern Idaho, your actions were a challenge. The thing to do wuth wolves is to rememer they are apex predators. Do not act like prey or they will attack. Do not challenge or they will attack. Instead, act as equals. Calm, confident behavior that seems to ignore the wolf's presence while formulating an exit stategy that is a caln and confident is the best way to avoid triggering the wolf's predator reactions.

      I learned this to protect my children. Education provides safety and freedom

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    32. The ways to protect yourself during an attack were nice but your goofy anti-wolf propaganda killed the article as did all the nutsos in your comments. If we human dumbasses would stop leaving garbage everywhere and feeding them (and would stop stealing their habitats with our overpopulation) they wouldn't be so likely to come near us. Also, most predatory animals have known for centuries that humans are weak prey, we have no natural defenses, this is why they have come to know us as a quick easy dinner. Maybe if more humans used fences, watched their demon spawn and their dogs when they live in rural areas or are camping, and if more humans understood that wildlife isn't here just for their amusement or sadistic needs to commit abuse, there wouldn't be so many attacks. Humans forgot a long time ago that they aren't special animals, that they are not immune from becoming dinner. We think it's horrific when another animal eats a human, but that is the way things are supposed to be, we are not special. If that human knew how to put up a good fight, it would not be dinner but if it failed, then so be it.

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    33. You can only imitate a wolf howl if you have good reason to do so. E.g. If people are on an expedition to find out if wolves are in the area. Wolf attacks are almost extinct so this is rubbish. Wolves are terrified of humans, that's why they attack.
      They were here before humans, so we need to start showing them a little respect and kindess.

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    34. All you wolf lovers out there should know that the only known truce between the armies of Imperial Germany and Russia occurred during the winter of 1916-17 in the Kovno-Wilna-Minsk District, after wolf attacks on soldiers had become a plague. Poison, hand grenades and even machine guns were ineffective without an organized campaign of eradication of the wolf packs. After several hundred wolves were killed, the rest fled, and the attacks ceased. Reported in the New York Times of July 29, 1917.

      http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9E0DE3DD103BE03ABC4151DFB166838C609EDE&oref=slogin

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    35. People, you all need to stop arguing about Nature, we shouldn't be arguing with each other. Nature is a powerful thing yes. Wolves aren't domesticated, they are wild, they can be bad just like us, it's their nature. Don't think for a second its not always our fault and their fault some people choose to out themselves in danger. As fat as attacking is concerned wolves take risks, they will be fierce if you're in their territory, they will not back down if you threaten them someway, like being near their own offsprings, point is then can and can't be dangerous.

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    36. Do you think wolfdogs are safe to keep as pets? I'm thinking of getting a Slovakian wolfdog but am slightly worried about the natural genetic predatory instincts coming to the fore, regardless of how well socialised the wolfdog is.

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    37. Wolves are beautiful creatures. Dogs are as well. the two together are pure angels. I have a wolfdog, Sierra, and she's the sweetest thing there has ever been. And the fact That wolves live in packs, a wolfdog will want to protect you from danger. Mr. Lenny Burch, I think that if you had a wolfdog, you would be safe from wolf attacks. I LOVE wolves, but I understand how dangerous they can be. So to answer your question, Neil, I highly recomend you get a wolfdog.

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